Tri-X, My New Favorite Color Film

The shot above was made with a B&W-only camera. The lower version: a one-click reimagining via Adobe’s latest “Neural Colorize” filter.

It’s impressive how the software can add color to the file. Yet:

What does color really add to the photo?

1 min read

Unmasking

We’ve all seen plenty of photos of people photographing people photographing each other, but not for a while. Not from me, at least.

Sunday in San Jose, two days before the legal CV-19 masking restrictions were (mostly) lifted – at least for now.

More Contrast

An edit and crop of the Monochrom sample shot from a few days ago.

Precisely Imprecise

For the previous post, I had to dig out some of my old files from a brief 2014 affair with the original Leica Monochrom.

Here’s one of the shots I liked that were made with it, in this case on the streets of Miami. The artist here told me he was from elsewhere but I can’t recall his name or those details any more. Or maybe I’m just being misguided by the tee-shirt.

Photos can trick memory as much as assist it.

Contrast Curves for Leica Monochrom

Adobe Camera Raw (ACR) has supported Leica Monchrom files for most of the past decade, yet the support seems to have been pretty modest – a linear mapping of the grayscale-source DNG values. Setting your preferences for “Camera Matching” has essentially no effect - the contrast adjustments in the Monochrom are ignored.

The pic above shows three versions. On the left, what ACR will deliver directly from the sensor: a full range but with flat tones. The center is what the EVF showed, and is the in-camera JPG. The right image is something getting closer to my final edit, based on a higher-contrast version like that at the center: closer to the EVF view than what was delivered by ACR.

I couldn’t find any publicly-available curves or presets for Monochrom DNGs to match the contrast ranges you might see in the EVF or JPGs. So: I made some. You can find the link below:

1 min read